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Japanese professor on Armenian Genocide

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Japanese professor Segava summed up the results of her 10-year study in Armenia for her book "Unforgettable Armenian Genocide". Japanese studies expert Asya Harutyunyan, who is well aware of the professor's work, regrets to mention that only individual professors talk about the Armenian Genocide in Japan, while it remains unrecognized at the state level.

Asya has lived and studied in Japan for three and a half years and currently works as a tour operator for the Japanese in Armenia and the Armenians in Japan. The expert says Armenians are very similar to the Japanese in terms of discipline.

"When I take Armenians to Japan, they always say it is as if they are at home because the Japanese are as hospitable as the Armenians," says the expert, adding that few Japanese know about Armenia.

"But there are more and more Japanese who know Armenian culture and like to visit Armenia, which is a land of wonders for them. There is also a growing number of Japanese studying Armenia," said Asya.

The Japanese studies expert mentioned that Professor Shiro Sasano opened a Department of Architecture at the University of Japan where students get acquainted with Armenian architecture. The professor has also published a book devoted to Armenian architectural monuments around the world.

Living in Japan for several years, Asya voiced regret over the March 11 earthquake that injured thousands, including Japanese families that she knew. Asya also shared an interesting story.

"In one of the Japanese villages, 120-year old women, who had seen a tsunami 100 years ago, drew a line in that village and warned not to build homes on the other side of that line. People listened to them and the tsunami didn't cross that line."